Wednesday Poem – Lake Lucerne ~ Bob Casey

Tomorrow September 22nd, in 1499, Switzerland became an independent state.  To celebrate that I thought a poem based in Switzerland would be nice… Enjoy!

lake-lucerne

Lake Lucerne

Ripples appear here and there
….on otherwise placid water.
Earlier downpours have dissipated
….as the sun sinks
….brushing hues of yellow
….against deep greens
….and turning leaves.
Summer flowers offer
….their last brilliance of color
….while distant chiseled peaks
….turn gray in the dimming light.
An alpine day comes to a close.

Bob Casey

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Review: Daimones (Daimones Trilogy #1) ~ Massimo Marino

DaimonesISBN ~ 978-1478347101
Publisher ~Booktrope Publishing
No. Of Pages ~ 330 pages
Links ~ Amazon

Your entry into an exciting Space Opera: the death and re-birth of the human race.

Nothing could have prepared them for the last day. Explore the future of humanity in Massimo Marino’s sci-fi debut, Daimones, an apocalyptic tale that feels like it could happen tomorrow. You may never sleep through a windstorm again.

Death swept away the lives of billions, but spared Dan Amenta and his family, leading them to an uncertain future. When merely surviving isn’t enough and the hunt for answers begins, memories from the past and troubling encounters lead Dan to the truth about the extermination of the human race. Distressing revelations will give new meaning to their very existence.

Early humans shaped the future and seeded a plan millions of years in the making. Now survivors must choose: Endure a future with no past or fade away into a past with no future?

4 Thumbs-UpI’ll get this out upfront, if you’re looking for an ‘end of life as we know it’ book that checks the blocks by featuring zombies and all their accompanying mayhem, this is not the book for you.  However, if you are looking for a novel in this genre that makes the possibility of such things happens you need to read this.

Having read all three books in this trilogy, and actually delaying my review until I had not only read them but owned them, I am only going to be featuring book one, as this is a good place to start.  I may at some point in the future review the other two. I’m also going explain my reasoning behind giving this book a 4 thumbs review, even though it could have quite easily gained that extra thumb; it was the main protagonist and his actions well into the book, he disappointed me so much that I felt he was the cause that I could not award this novel 5 thumbs.

The main protagonist in this book is a man such as any you may meet in the place you live; he has a job that he promptly loses in the first few pages, a loving wife and an adoring daughter.  His only knowledge of the events that happen in the course of the book are gleaned from movies he’s watched, this in itself makes him and his family real.  Most people reading this book will only have Hollywood to pull from when it comes to dealing with events such as these, and actually having the character in a book state this makes them, and their subsequent actions (to a point) believable and acceptable.  The main character is written well and given all the traits we find in those we come into contact with on a daily basis.  I felt a connection with this man and his family, but that all changed after his misdeed and I found myself wondering if his previous actions had been based on deception and insincerity too.  His spouse, although as well written and detailed as the main character became, at times, very wearing on my nerves and I felt that I really wanted to give her a good shake to make her wake up to what was happening.  The daughter of the family was written to portray perfectly that resilience children seems to have in the most difficult of situations; after her initial shock over events she quickly became an integral part of the survival of her family, more than her Mother did in some cases.

This book started out with events that we read about in the newspapers each day, and set the tone for a thoughtful look at what is rapidly becoming a worn out genre.  Setting the book in an area other than North America was refreshing and also an indication that should terrible things happen, they are not just going to affect the residents of the continental United States.  I thoroughly enjoyed the locations and reading about them took me back to the time we spent in this area, so much so that I felt an ache over the devastation described to some of these beautiful places.

If you are looking for an ‘intelligent’ take on the end of humanity, this is definitely a book that you will want to read.  It is not fast paced and full of gory action, but lays things out as it could be.  I thoroughly enjoyed this book and, if not for the bad life choices made by the main character, if would definitely have made a 5 thumbs rating.  If you want to find out whether he redeems himself, you will have to read all three books.

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Happy Frankenstein Day.

Frankenstein - Mary Shelley

It’s the birthday of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, my all time favourite classic Author.  Born Mary Wollstonecraft  Godwin in London, England (1797), she is the author of Frankenstein ( published January 1, 1818), which is considered the first science fiction novel ever written, and the book that I read over and over again finding new angles in its pages each time I do.

After her marriage to the poet Percy Shelley, the couple went to stay in a lakeside cottage in Switzerland with the poet Lord Byron in the summer of 1816. One rainy night, after reading a German book of ghost stories, Byron suggested that they all write their own horror stories.

Everyone else wrote a story within the next day, but Mary took almost a week. Finally, she wrote an early version of a story about a scientist who brings a dead body to life. She turned the story into a novel, and Frankenstein was published in 1818. She was 21 years old.

There are many reasons that this novel has me returning to it time and time again, not least of all the fact that it was totally different from the works other Authors of her period were writing.  It was dark and haunting in a way that Dickens and Bronte weren’t, and led to many moments where I actually was made to think outside the box and beyond the words on the pages.  It fed my questioning mind, and still does, bringing up questions such as “Could the monster and Victor actually be different sides of the same coin?”

But why has this novel survived the test of time, in fact thrived over the 200 years since it was written?  Ronald Levao, co-editor of “The Annotated Frankenstein” (Harvard Univ. Press), “She articulated our desire for, and fear about, the transgression of fundamental boundaries,” he says, “between vitality and dead matter, the human and the inhuman, ideal aspiration and monstrous consequence.”  It seems he may be right as those monstrous consequences will be in play again this January with the release of “I Frankenstein,” a movie based on the graphic novel by Kevin Grevioux, who graduated from Howard University in Washington.  Although the movie has very little to do with Shelley’s novel, it is still keeping alive the premise she intended when she put a pen to paper.

I will be celebrating Frankenstein Day by pulling my copy off the bookshelf again and settling in to read it over this holiday weekend.  How will you be celebrating?

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